Highland Cow in the Winter Sun

© Mark Stothard. Buy this image. ref MSP20101205_132539_D3S3145.

 

Dunster Castle Panoramic

Dunster Castle is a former motte and bailey castle, now a country house, in the village of Dunster, Somerset, England. The castle lies on the top of a steep hill called the Tor, and has been fortified since the late Anglo-Saxon period. After the Norman conquest of England in the 11th century, William de Mohun constructed a timber castle on the site as part of the pacification of Somerset. A stone shell keep was built on the motte by the start of the 12th century, and the castle survived a siege during the early years of the Anarchy. At the end of the 14th century, the de Mohuns sold the castle to the Luttrell family, who continued to occupy the property until the late 20th century.

© Mark Stothard. Buy this image.

 

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Dunster Forest Sign

Countryside walkers wood sign pointing to Dunster Forest, Crown Estate on a sunny autumn morning.

 

© Mark Stothard. Buy this image.

 

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Highland Cattle in the snow on Exmoor

Highland cow sitting in the winter sun on Exmoor National Park.

© Mark Stothard. Buy this image.

 

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Highland Cattle on Exmoor

A long way from home, Highland cattle can be found if you look hard enough on Exmoor.

© Mark Stothard. Buy this image.

 

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Exmoor Ponies

Exmoor ponies located at Dunkery on Exmoor National Park.

© Mark Stothard. Buy this image.

 

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Tarr Steps, Exmoor

The Tarr Steps are a clapper bridge across the River Barle in the Exmoor National Park, Somerset, England. There are 17 spans across 50 meters (55 yd), the top slabs weigh 1-2 tons and are about 39 inches (99 cm) above normal water level. The largest slab is over 8 feet (2.4 m) long and is about 5 feet (1.5 m) wide. This is one of the best-known monuments on Exmoor. Its age is unknown, as several theories claim that Tarr Steps dates from the Bronze Age but others date them from around 1400 AD.

© Mark Stothard. Buy this image.

 

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Tarr Steps #Exmoor

The Tarr Steps are a clapper bridge across the River Barle in the Exmoor National Park, Somerset, England. There are 17 spans across 50 meters (55 yd), the top slabs weigh 1-2 tons and are about 39 inches (99 cm) above normal water level. The largest slab is over 8 feet (2.4 m) long and is about 5 feet (1.5 m) wide. This is one of the best-known monuments on Exmoor. Its age is unknown, as several theories claim that Tarr Steps dates from the Bronze Age but others date them from around 1400 AD.

© Mark Stothard. Buy this image.

 

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Tall Tree Trial Exmoor

Tall Tree Trial within the Crown estate Dunster, Exmoor.

© Mark Stothard. Buy this image.

 

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Tall Tree Skyline

Circle of trees within the Crown estate Dunster, Exmoor.

© Mark Stothard. Buy this image.

 

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Low Tide #Porlock Harbour

Sailing boats low tide at Porlock harbour, Exmoor.

© Mark Stothard. Buy this image.

 

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Tarr Steps #exmoor @exmoornp

Tarr Steps is one of my favourite places of Exmoor National Park, every time I visited this valley the experience of new colours, sounds, smells and wildlife always took my breath away.

The Tarr Steps is a clapper bridge across the River Barle in the Exmoor National Park, Somerset, England. There are 17 spans across 50 meters (55 yards).

The top slabs weigh 1-2 tons and are about 39 inches (99 cm) above normal water level. The largest slab is over 8 feet (2.4 m) long and is about 5 feet (1.5 m) wide.

This is one of the best-known monuments on Exmoor. Its age is unknown, as several theories claim that Tarr Steps dates from the Bronze Age, but others date them from around 1400 AD.

Ever visited Tarr Steps? Please do leave your experience of Tarr Steps in the comments below.

Don’t forget, you can purchase a copy of this print to hang on your wall, just click on the photo.

Mark’s score for Tarr Steps : 7 out of 10.

© Mark Stothard

Saint Georges Church #Exmoor



The Priory Church of St George in Dunster, Somerset, England, is predominantly 15th-century with evidence of 12th- and 13th-century work. It has been designated as a Grade I listed building.[/caption] been designated as a Grade I listed building.